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Faculty Directory

Christopher M. Barnes

Associate Professor of Management
Evert McCabe Endowed Fellow

Featured Video

Education

PhD Michigan State University (2009)
BS Pacific Lutheran University (1999)

Academic Expertise

emotions
ethics
human sustainability
leadership
sleep
teamwork

Current Research

Sleep and fatigue issues in the workplace
Team performance and decision making
Emotional labor
Behavioral ethics
Compensation

Positions Held

At the University of Washington since 2013
Assistant Professor, Virginia Tech, 2011-2013
Assistant Professor, United States Military Academy at West Point, 2009-2011
Research Assistant, Michigan State University, 2004-2009
Behavioral Scientist/Acquisitions Officer, United States Air Force, 2000-2004

Selected Publications

  1. Why so serious? A laboratory and field investigation of the link between morality and humor
    Journal Article:Yam, K. C., Barnes, C. M., Leavitt, K., Wei, W, Lau, T. C., & Uhlmann, E., (in press). Journal of Personality and Social Psychology,
  2. Bad behavior keeps you up at night: Counterproductive work behaviors, rumination, and insomnia
    Journal Article:Yuan, Z., Barnes, C. M., & Li, Y., (2018). Journal of Applied Psychology, pp. 383-398.
  3. Sleep well, lead better
    Journal Article:Barnes, C. M., (2018). Harvard Business Review, pp. 140-143.
  4. Helping employees sleep well: Effects of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia on work outcomes
    Journal Article:Barnes, C. M., Miller, J. A., & Bostock, S., (2017). Journal of Applied Psychology, pp. 104-113.
  5. Lack of sleep and the development of leader-follower relationships over time
    Journal Article:Guarana, C. L., & Barnes, C. M., (2017). Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Vol. 141, pp. 57-73.
  6. Sabotaging the Benefits of Our Own Human Capital: Work Unit Characteristics and Sleep
    Journal Article:Barnes, C. M., Jiang, K., & Lepak, D, (2016). Journal of Applied Psychology, pp. 209-221.
  7. Too tired to inspire or be inspired: Sleep deprivation and charismatic leadership
    Journal Article:Barnes, C. M., Guarana, C. L., Nauman, S., & Kong, D. T., (2016). Journal of Applied Psychology, pp. 1191-1199.
  8. Prioritizing sleep health: Public health policy recommendations. Perspectives on Psychological Science
    Journal Article:Barnes, C. M. & Drake, C. L., (2015). Perspectives on Psychological Science,, Vol. 10, pp. 733-737.
  9. Sleep and moral awareness
    Journal Article:Barnes, C. M., Gunia, B., & Wagner, D. T., (2015). Journal of Sleep Research, Vol. 24, pp. 181-188.
  10. You wouldn’t like me when I’m sleepy: Leader sleep, daily abusive supervision, and work unit engagement
    Journal Article:Barnes, C. M., Bhave, D., Christian, M., & Lucianetti, L., (2015). Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 58(5), pp. 1419-1437.
  11. Beginning the workday yet already depleted? Consequences of late-night smartphone use and sleep
    Journal Article:Lanaj, K., Johnson, R., & Barnes, C. M., (2014). Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Vol. 124, pp. 11-23.
  12. Morning employees are perceived as better employees: Employees’ start times influence supervisor performance ratings
    Journal Article:Yam, K. C., Fehr, R., & Barnes, C. M., (2014). Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 99, pp. 1288-1299.
  13. The morality of larks and owls: Unethical behavior depends on chronotype as well as time-of-day
    Journal Article:Gunia, B., Barnes, C. M., & Sah, S., (2014). Psychological Science, Vol. 25, pp. 2272-2274.
  14. Borrowing from sleep to pay work and family: Expanding time-based conflict to the broader non-work domain
    Journal Article:Barnes, C. M., Wagner, D. T., & Ghumman, S., (2012). Personnel Psychology, Vol. 65, pp. 789-819.
  15. Lost sleep and cyberloafing: Evidence from the laboratory and a Daylight Saving Time quasi-experiment
    Journal Article:Wagner, D. T., Barnes, C. M., Lim, V., & Ferris, D. L., (2012). Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 97, pp. 1068-1076.
  16. Lack of sleep and unethical behavior
    Journal Article:Barnes, C. M., Schaubroeck, J. M., Huth, M., & Ghumman, S., (2011). Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Vol. 115, pp. 169-180.
  17. Changing to daylight saving time cuts into sleep and increases workplace injuries
    Journal Article:Barnes, C. M. & Wagner, D. T., (2009). Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 94, pp. 1305-1317.
  18. Sleep deprivation and teams: Burning the midnight oil or playing with fire?
    Journal Article:Barnes, C. M. & Hollenbeck, J. R., (2009). Academy of Management Review, Vol. 34, pp. 56-66..

Honors and Awards

Responsible Research in Management Award (2017)
Finalist for the AOM HR Division Scholarly Achievement Award (2017)
Nominee for the Kanter Award for Excellence in Work Family Research (2017)
SIOP Distinguished Early Career Contributions Award - Science (2017)
Finalist for Paper of the Year award from Personnel Psychology (2016)
Western Academy of Management Ascendant Scholar Award (2014)
Management Department Faculty Research Excellence Award, Virginia Tech (2013)
SIOP Top Poster Presentation Award (2013)
Scholar of the Week (1 university level awarded weekly), Virginia Tech (2012)
Management Department Faculty Research Excellence Award, Virginia Tech (2012)

Academic Service

Faculty Mentor Award, for mentoring PhD students (2018)
Outstanding Reviewer Award, Academy of Management Review (2017)
Outstanding Reviewer Award, Academy of Management Journal (2016)
Outstanding Reviewer Award, Academy of Management Journal (2014)
CIDER Teacher of the Week, Virginia Tech (2012)
Scholar of the Week (1 university level awarded weekly), Virginia Tech (2012)
Favorite Faculty (student-nominated), Virginia Tech (2012)
Outstanding Reviewer Award, Academy of Management Review (2010)

Courses Taught

I teach organizational behavior, focusing on leading teams and organizations, primarily at the MBA level. This focus on managing people is intended to help you see the importance of good people management, including how managing people represents most firms’ best source of competitive advantage. My courses are empirically based, using a foundation of state of the art research to build the content. One of the most common statements you will hear from me is “What do the data say?” I utilize a mixture of lectures, articles, podcasts, TED Talk videos, popular press examples, case studies, simulations, and various forms of in-class discussions and exercises in order to provide a diverse mixture of methods for learning. Student contributions and discussions are important components of my classes.

Selected Presentations

TEDx Talk: Sleep Well to Work Well: http://depts.washington.edu/foster/sleep-well-to-work-well-chris-barnes-tedx/