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Marketing PhD Specialization

General Information

The subject of marketing is concerned with the exchange process between individuals and organizations. The objective of the doctoral program is to gain an understanding of how this process develops and evolves. Also, research methods for improving the practice of marketing for the benefit of organizations and institutions, consumers, and society are investigated. Most doctoral students accept academic positions upon completion. In addition to recommended course work, students participate in research projects, either individually or jointly with faculty or fellow students, and write an original dissertation. Current faculty interests in marketing include theoretical and institutional aspects of (1) product policies, (2) managing advertising and other forms of promotion, (3) establishing and managing distribution systems, (4) pricing decisions, (5) strategic planning, (6) competitive analysis, (7) consumer decision making, (8) marketing research and data analysis, (9) marketing organizations, (10) international marketing, and (11) social and political issues.

Department web site
Marketing Faculty

Admission Requirements

Applicants who plan to major in marketing must have completed an undergraduate degree. An MBA is not required and prior degrees need not be in business. An admission committee of faculty members reviews all completed applications. While the committee considers all relevant factors in its recommendations, important factors include past academic performance and GMAT scores. The GRE can be substituted for the GMAT but the GMAT is preferred. In some cases we may request a personal interview. Successful students have good communication skills, are intellectually curious, and self-motivated. Students must satisfy the university’s language proficiency requirements in order to qualify for a teaching assistantship.

Recommended Preparation Prior to Entry

Students entering the PhD Program as marketing majors should be comfortable with the basic concepts of calculus and linear algebra before they arrive on campus. It is strongly recommended that all new marketing majors carefully review this material during the summer before entering the program.

Marketing Area Faculty Coordinator

Prof. Oliver Rutz, Marketing Area Faculty Coordinator, would be glad to answer your questions. Contact him by phone (206-221-1856) or by email (orutz@uw.edu).

New PhD students majoring in marketing are initially advised by the Marketing Area Faculty Coordinator. Until the student’s supervisory committee has been established (usually by the end of the first year), the Marketing Area Faculty Coordinator assists the student in choosing appropriate courses, approves course of studies, and monitors the student’s progress.

At the end of each academic year, the Marketing Department faculty will provide every doctoral student with a formal evaluation of his or her progress in the program. At the start of the second year, the evaluation will be done by faculty members who supervised the student’s first year paper. At the start of the third year, the evaluation will be by the student’s supervisory committee and will be based on coursework, 1st & 2nd year papers, and participation in departmental seminars and workshops.

Marketing majors are required to take at least 18 courses (in addition to MKTG 599, the Marketing Work­shops; and MKTG 600, Independent Study) distributed across their major and minor areas of study. There must be a minimum of four courses in each area of study.

The following courses are required for all market­ing majors. The number of credits for each course is indicated in parentheses after the course number.

Course Number Catalog Title
MKTG 581 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Consumer Behavior
MKTG 582 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Multivariate Analysis for Marketing Research
MKTG 583 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Marketing Strategy
MKTG 584 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Research Issues in Marketing
MKTG 591 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Consumer Behavior Research Topics
MKTG 593 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Marketing Models

Three of these six seminars are offered each year. All marketing majors are expected to participate in the Marketing Workshop (MKTG 599) each quarter of the regular academic year in which they are enrolled in residence.

Research Methods Minor Area Requirements
Marketing is a three-area program. In addition to the marketing area, all students majoring in marketing are required to choose Research Methods and one supporting area. Research methods courses should be considered in two stages: (1) basic statistics and (2) special topics electives. Students should take a minimum of 18 credits, involving typi­cally two basic statistics courses and four electives. The basic courses require prior or concurrent prepa­ration in mathematics. It is expected that some students will have more extensive background preparation in mathematics and/or be more oriented toward quantitative methods than other students, so there are two suggested tracks for taking basic statistics courses.

Stage 1. Basic Statistics

Track I

STAT 341 (4) Introduction to Probability and Statistical Inference I
STAT 342 (4) Introduction to Probability and Statistical Inference II
or
STAT 481 (5) Introduction to Mathematical Statistics
BARM 580 (4) Applied Econometrics I

 

Math prerequisites

MATH 126 (5) Calculus with Analytic Geometry III
MATH 308 (3) Matrix Algebra with Applications

 

Track II

STAT 394 (3) Probability I
STAT 395 (3) Probability II
or
STAT 512 (4) Statistical Inference
STAT 513 (4) Statistical Inference

 

Math prerequisites

MATH 342 (3) Advanced Multivariate Calculus 1
MATH 308 (3) Matrix Algebra with Applications

 

Stage 2. Special Topics Electives

There are a variety of areas that can be pursued, depending on the student’s dissertation research area. Four are listed below but other variations are possible.

Experimental design/analysis

BARM 590 (4) Behavioral Research Methods-Theory and Design
BARM 591 (4) Behavioral Research Methods-Approaches and Applications
PSYCH 525 (4) Linear Models and Data Analysis
PSYCH 526 (4) Multivariate Statistics
BIOST 521 (4) Biostatistics for Experimentalists
PSYCH 519 (3) Statistical Methods in Longitudinal Research
STAT 486 (3) Experimental Design
STAT/BIOST 577 (3) Advanced Design and Analysis of Experiments

 

Multivariate statistics

STAT/BIOST 570 (3) Advanced Applied Statistics and Linear Models
STAT/BIOST 571 (3) Advanced Applied Statistics and Linear Models
STAT/BIOST 572 (3) Advanced Applied Statistics and Linear Models
STAT/BIOST 573 (3) Multivariate Statistical Methods
STAT 542 (3) Multivariate Analysis
STAT 428 (4) Multivariate Analysis for the Social Sciences
EDPSY 594 (5) Advanced Correlational Techniques

 

Econometrics

BARM 580 (4) Applied Econometrics I
BARM 581 (4) Applied Econometrics II
ECON 580 (4) Econometrics I
ECON 581 (4) Econometrics II
ECON 582 (4) Econometrics III
ECON 583 (3) Econometric Theory I
ECON 584 (3) Econometric Theory II
ECON 585 (3) Applied Microeconomics

 

Mathematical Modeling

QMETH 580 (4) Mathematical Programming
QMETH 592 (4) Stochastic Models: Queueing and Simulation
QMETH 501 (2) Decision Support Models
MATH 515 (5) Fundamentals of Optimization
MATH 516 (3) Numerical Optimization
MATH 517 (3) Optimization Under Uncertainty
MATH 509 (3) Theory of Optimal Control

A variety of other useful research methods courses may be found. Please check the university course catalog and talk to professors who are knowl­edgeable about these subjects.

Other Minor Area Requirements
The supporting minor area depends upon the student’s research interest. However, students are strongly recommended to choose a behavioral science discipline (anthropology, economics, psychology or sociology). The student must take a minimum of four courses in each minor area. There are many course options that are possible in the various supporting fields. Further, the courses change from year to year so it is difficult to provide an accurate and up-to-date listing. Below are courses that have been offered and are relevant to marketing. Please check the university catalog, the instructors, and your marketing faculty advisors before registering for one of these classes.

Economics MinorThe economics minor area must include the following three-course sequence:

ECON 500 (4) Microeconomic Analysis I
ECON 501 (4) Microeconomic Analysis II
ECON 508 (4) Microeconomic Analysis III

 

and at least one additional course selected in consultation with the marketing doctoral area coordinator or the student’s supervisory committee. The following economics courses are recommended:

ECON 505 (4) Microeconomic Theory: Problems and Applications
ECON 531 (3) Theory of Industrial Organization I
ECON 532 (3) Theory of Industrial Organization II
ECON 516 (3) Introduction To Non-Cooperative Game Theory

 

Psychology Minor A minor area in psychology in­volves taking at least four classes from the following list of relevant courses.

PSYCH 507 (5) Cogntition
PSYCH 508 (3) Cognitive Perception
PSYCH 511 (3) Personality
PSYCH 515 (4) Personality and Social Development
PSYCH 528 (4, max 8) Research Methods in Social Psychology
PSYCH 560 (1-2) Research Strategies
PSYCH 561 (2) Current Trends in Psychology
PSYCH 564 (5) Advanced Attitude Theory

 

Sociology Minor A minor area in sociology involves taking at least four classes from the following list of relevant courses.

SOC 501(1-3, max. 3) Proseminar
SOC 510 (3) Seminar in Sociological Theory
SOC 511 (3) Classical Social Theory
SOC 513 (3) Demography and Ecology
SOC 514 (3) Current Theories in Social Psychology
SOC 518 (3) Social Stratification
SOC 584 (3, max. 9) Special Topics in Social Psychology

 

Anthropology Minor – A minor area in anthropology involves taking at least four classes from the following list of relevant courses.

ANTH 500 (6) Preceptorial Reading
ANTH 507 (2) Current Issues in Sociocultural Anthropology
ANTH 508 (2) Current Issues in Sociocultural Anthropology
ANTH 525 (3, max. 6) Seminar in Cultural Processes
ANTH 527 (3) Ethnicities, Nations and Cultural Identities
ANTH 542 (3) Seminar in Cognitive Anthropology
ANTH 565 (5) Theory of Sociocultural Anthropology
ANTH 566 (5) Theory of Sociocultural Anthropology
ANTH 567 (5) Theory of Sociocultural Anthropology

First Year

Autumn Winter Spring Summer
MKTG 581 Seminar in Consumer Behavior MKTG 583 Seminar in Marketing Strategy MKTG 582 Seminar in Multivariate Analysis Elective
RM Course RM Course RM Course
Elective Elective Elective
MKTG 599
Marketing Workshop
MKTG 599
Marketing Workshop
MKTG 599
Marketing Workshop
Teaching Effectiveness Seminar

RM = Research Methods


Second Year

Autumn Winter Spring Summer
MKTG 593 Seminar in Marketing Models (MS) MKTG 584 Research Issues in Marketing (MS) MKTG 591 Seminar in Consumer Behavior Topics (CB) Area Examination
RM Course RM Course RM Course
Elective Elective Elective
MKTG 599
Marketing Workshop
MKTG 599
Marketing Workshop
MKTG 599
Marketing Workshop

RM = Research Methods


First Year Research Paper
During the summer between their first and second year, doctoral students will work with one or more faculty members to prepare ~20 page paper that demonstrates their ability to summarize a body of research, identify key findings that suggest research hypotheses, and propose a methodology to test these hypotheses. The faculty committee will evaluate the paper, providing written feedback as to its overall quality and suggest improvements. The student will make a short presentation (20-30 minutes) of their 1st year paper during the fall quarter of their second year. The student will be given a pass or revise evaluation. An acceptable revision will be required before the start of winter quarter. Faculty will be encouraged to provide the resources necessary for the student to test some of the hypotheses during the second year. The goal is to have a publishable paper under review before the second year.

Second Year Research Paper
In addition to preparing and sitting for the written area examination, students will be expected to develop a second research paper, one more closely linked to the likely dissertation, during the time period between the 2nd and 3rd years. This paper will be due by the start of winter quarter, presented during winter quarter, and developed under the direction of a faculty committee. The committee would most likely consist of members of the student’s supervisory committee.

Students who minor in marketing select courses from the following three lists. Students with three area programs are required to take three courses while students with four area programs are required to take at least two courses. All minors must register for the Marketing Workshop (MKTG 599) for six quarters.

Course Number Catalog Title
MKTG 581 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Consumer Behavior
MKTG 582 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Multivariate Analysis for Marketing Research
MKTG 583 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Marketing Strategy
MKTG 584 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Research Issues in Marketing
MKTG 591 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Consumer Behavior Research Topics
MKTG 593 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Marketing Models


List A
– Recommended classes for all quantitatively-oriented marketing minors.

Course Number Catalog Title
MKTG 582 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Multivariate Analysis for Marketing Research
MKTG 592 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Marketing Models


List B
– Recommended classes for all behaviorally-oriented marketing minors.

Course Number Catalog Title
MKTG 581 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Consumer Behavior
MKTG 591 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Consumer Behavior Research Topics


List C
– Recommended classes for strategy-oriented marketing minors.

Course Number Catalog Title
MKTG 583 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Marketing Strategy
MKTG 584 (4) Doctoral Seminar in Research Issues in Marketing

Written Area or Qualifying Examination
It is expected that students will complete all course work required for a major in marketing by the end of their second year. After completing this course work, each marketing PhD student must demonstrate his or her academic competency in marketing by passing a written area examination. The marketing area exam is offered during the Summer Quarter each year.


General Examination

After successful completion of all major and minor course work and written area exams, the supervisory committee administers a general examination. The purpose of the general examination is to enable the student orally to demonstrate a command of the subject matter in marketing and his or her minor areas of study, the ability to recognize significant research questions in marketing, and the expertise to develop research strategies and methods appropriate to these research questions. The student’s supervisory committee determines the precise format of the general exam. Typically, the general examination involves a discussion of the student’s dissertation proposal. After passing the general exam, the student is admitted to candidacy and develops and/or refines a dissertation topic. The reading committee guides the student’s dissertation.


Dissertation
The candidate’s dissertation must represent an original and independent investigation. It should reflect not only the mastery of research techniques, but also the ability to select an important problem and to deal with it competently.

Once the dissertation proposal is well defined the reading committee approves it. Approval follows the student’s presenting a version of the proposal in the Marketing Workshop (MKTG 599). After formal approval of the dissertation proposal, the student completes the research and writes the dissertation.

The candidate must register for a minimum of 27 credits of BA 800, Doctoral Dissertation, over a period of at least three quarters.


Final Examination
The final examination, which is administered by the supervisory committee, is an oral defense of the dissertation. The candidate may be asked to revise or extend portions of the dissertation before it is fully acceptable to the committee. If so, he or she then has 60 days to file the dissertation with the Graduate School.

The objective of the doctoral program in marketing is for students to gain an understanding of how the exchange process between individuals and organizations develops and evolves. Most of our doctoral students accept academic positions upon completing the program. In addition to recommended course work, students participate in research projects and write original dissertations. At Foster there is a strong level of collaboration between our faculty and PhD students. Learn more about our PhD students below.

Ran (Doris) Du
Area of study: Quantitative marketing – empirical modeling
Mentor: Oliver Rutz
Expected graduation: June 2017

Xingbo Li
Area of study: Consumer psychology
of hope
Advisor: Shailendra Pratap Jain
Expected graduation: June 2015

Olga Martin
Area of study: Consumer loyalty and
the effect of romantic
relationships on consumer
behavior
Mentor: Shailendra Pratap Jain
Expected graduation: June 2017

Sokiente (Tari) Dagogo-Jack
Area of study: Self-evaluative motives and
self-regulatory behaviors
Advisor: Mark Forehand
Expected graduation: June 2015

Jane So
Area of study: Consumer behavior with
emphasis on emotion,
poverty and power
Mentor: Nidhi Agrawal
Expected graduation: June 2017

George F. Watson, IV
Area of study: Channel strategy
Advisor: Robert W. Palmatier
Expected graduation: June 2015

Kyra Wiggin
Area of study: Effects of curiosity and
tolerance for ambiguity on
experiential consumption
Advisor: Shailendra Pratap Jain
Expected graduation: March 2015

Prabirendra Chatterjee
Research: Sponsored search advertising and online auctions.
Graduation date: June 2013
Now at: Sabanci University, Istanbul

Conor Henderson
Research: Strategy (Unintended Consequences of Firm’s Relationship Marketing Efforts)
Graduation date: June 2013
Now at: University of Oregon

Meng-Hua Hsieh
Research: Consumer mindsets and persuasion
Graduation date: June 2013

Ju-Yeon Lee
Research: Marketing strategy, customer-centric structure, quantitative empirical modeling.
Graduation date: June 2013
Now at: Lehigh University

Julian Saint Clair
Research: Self‐Concept Structure, Associative Learning and Context Effects as Drivers of Advertising Response, Judgment and Decision Making.
Graduation date: June 2013
Now at: Loyola Marymount University